A Visit to an Alien World

Just imagine the following exciting and wonderful possibility – the Kepler automated astronomical observatory or the Terrestrial Planet Finder, slated for launch sometime in the year 2015, finds a planet capable of supporting life in orbit around another star a mere six light years away named Darwin IV.

Life on Earth was shaped by the inexorable laws of evolution through natural selection. Today on Discovery Enterprise we will investigate the wonderful and exotic life forms of Darwin IV and see one of the many possible ecosystems that have arisen in Darwin’s Universe of life.

Alien Planet

Alien Planet is a 94 minute special on Discovery Channel about two internationally built robot probes investigating for alien life on the fictional planet Darwin IV. It was based on the book Expedition, by sci-fi/fantasy artist and writer Wayne Douglas Barlowe, who was also executive producer on the special. It premiered on May 14, 2005.

You can also view this documentary in its entirety on Google video.

Watch Alien Planet in Educational View More Free Videos Online at Veoh.com

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1 Response to “A Visit to an Alien World”


  1. 1 Tom Marking April 5, 2009 at 6:48 pm

    Great video, Alex. I have a couple of comments. Having only 3 probes (Balboa, Da Vinci, and Newton) and having one of them explode before impact seems a bit of bad luck. Given the enormous expense of the mission I would expect something like 10-20 probes.Anyway, the various lifeforms presented were all pretty cool. I guess my favorite was the grove-back, but a question occurred to me, if it absorbs nutrients through its skin in its underbelly why does it have a mouth that looks just like an earth creature? It seemed to me that 90 percent of the lifeforms presented had bilateral symmetry which seems to earth-like to me.Also, I thought the balloon transportation (inflated with methane gas?) was not workable. Maintaining neutral buoyancy would not be easy. Also, since Darwin 4 had a thicker atmosphere than earth going against the prevailing wind would be difficult and energy-consuming. It would be better to have wheeled robots on the surface.But, still an impressive showcase of special effects.— Tom Marking


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